Evidence of Teaching

This page contains a brief description of the courses I have taught along with supplemental resources, such as teaching evaluations and sample lectures. The bottom half of this page documents my work in the Certificate of Accomplishment in Teaching (CoAT) program during my doctoral training, including a description of courses  I attended and several reflection essays in which I synthesized some of what I learned.

Courses taught include:

Furman:

  • ECN 244: Behavioral Economics (F2018)
  • ECN: 225: Statistics for Economics & Business (Sp2018)
  • ECN 111: Introduction to Economics (F2017, Sp2018, F2018)
  • ECN 243: Economic Growth & Development (F2017)

NCSU:

  • EC 495: Special Topics, Development Economics (F2016, Sp2017)
  • EC 351: Data Analysis for Economists (F2015, Sp2016, F2016, Sp2017)
  • EC 301: Intermediate Microeconomics (Sp2016)
  • ARE 336: Introduction to Resource and Environmental Economics (F2015, Sp2015, F2014)
  • EC 202: Principles of Macroeconomics (Sp2014, F2013)
  • EC 205-Lab: Fundamentals of Economics, Lab Sections only (F2012, Sp2013)

 

Certificate of Accomplishment in Teaching (CoAT)

Below, I provide a description of the work I completed in the CoAT program and three essays I wrote about how the program helped me to define my teaching philosophy.

Here is an essay I wrote about course planning that synthesizes what I learned from several workshops.

Here is an essay I wrote about in-class teaching that synthesizes what I learned from several workshops.

Here is a short reflection I wrote about what I gained from participating in the CoAT program.

Workshops I have completed in the Certificate of Accomplishment in Teaching (CoAT):

Teaching Philosophy/Teaching Portfolio Kickstart and Polish

  • 11/5/13
  • Susanna Klingenberg, Beth Overman
  • This workshop was designed to teach participants what a teaching portfolio is and how to write an effective teaching philosophy. This course challenged me to think more critically about my teaching philosophy and to define it more concretely.

Writing Learning Outcomes

  • 1/30/13 – 2/3/13
  • Dr. Honeycutt
  • This workshop was designed to introduce participants to the process of writing effective learning outcomes.  As the basis for structured teaching and instruction, writing learning outcomes helped me to define my expectations and convey them to students. In this workshop, we studied Bloom’s taxonomy  and focused on how to evaluate students on higher levels of thinking, like evaluation and creation of ideas.

Incorporating Active Learning Strategies in Your Online Environment

  • 1/23/13 – 1/27/13
  • Dr. Honeycutt
  • This workshop was designed to learn teaching strategies and techniques to create an online learning environment that actively engages their learners and creates a sense of community. Though I have not taught an online course, my participation in this course has better prepared me for the possibility of teaching an online class in the future. I have also used techniques from this course to improve the online companions to my campus classes.

Establishing Authority and Credibility in the Classroom

  • 7/18/12
  • Dr. Honeycutt
  • This workshop was designed to discuss how instructor credibility and legitimacy is established or lost and explore ways to respond to subtle and direct challenges to authority.  Discuss how to change an environment once this type of challenge has occurred in order to refocus and re-establish stability in the classroom. Though I have not had the chance to utilize strategies for overcoming challenges to authority, this course helped me to establish my credibility in the classroom.

Effective Questioning Strategies

  • 6/25/12
  • Dr. Honeycutt
  • This workshop was designed to help participants explore strategies and techniques for asking questions effectively to generate more student participation. We discussed word choice, timing, types of questions, and style of presentation.

Helping Students Organize Information: Concept Mapping

  • 6/5/12 – 6/8/12
  • Dr. Honeycutt
  • This workshop was designed to teach participants how to better organize material and to convey that structure to students.

Introduction to Teaching

  • 8/10/11 – 8/12/11
  • Dr. Honeycutt
  • The Introduction to Teaching workshop was designed to introduce participants to the fundamentals of effective teaching and learning in the university classroom through exploration, application, and reflection.  Through this workshop, I learned a variety of assessment techniques and best practices for enhancing teaching and learning in the university classroom.

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